Author - ea_admin

World Bank Approves $40 Million to Strengthen Social Risks Management

WASHINGTON, June 20, 2017—The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors has approved a $40 million equivalent IDA credit* to the Republic of Uganda for the Strengthening Social Risk Management and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Prevention and Response Project.

The Government of Uganda recognizes GBV as a serious problem and approved a National Policy on the Elimination of GBV in October 2016.  This project, which was approved June 20, 2017, will support the implementation of the policy and will also help strengthen systems for managing social risk in development projects.

GBV is a serious problem across many continents and countries.  Acceptance of intimate partner violence, however, is particularly high in the Africa Region – on average around 30 percent, which is more than twice the average of the rest of the developing world at 14 percent.  “Rates of GBV in Uganda are high,” said Hon. Janat Mukwaya, Minister of Gender, Labor and Social Development“With 62 percent of women and 59 percent of men aged 15-49 in Uganda having reported experiencing physical or sexual violence at least once since the age of 15.  This project aims to help address this disturbing trend.”

The World Bank Country Manager, Christina Malmberg Calvo added that, “Uganda has a number of tried and tested interventions that have shown to be effective in reducing the incidence of GBV through intensive behavior change communication. The project builds on these experiences to take them to scale. The project will also invest in strengthening the capacity of key front-line services to address the needs of survivors of GBV with a strong focus in the health sector.”

As part of this broader agenda on the overall management of social risk, the project aims to address the underlying causes of GBV by developing and expanding prevention programs and increasing response services for survivors of GBV in targeted districts.

Specifically, the project will focus on:

  • promoting behavior change and strengthening referral mechanisms, and
  • strengthening the responsiveness of front-line service providers to cases of GBV, and improving their ability to provide quality care.

*The International Development Association (IDA) provides concessional resources to Uganda, and this $40 million credit has a zero percentage interest rate, with a final maturity of 38 years, including a grace period of 6 years.

Source

Read more...

Europe steps up its support to the refugee response in Uganda with amounts almost 210 million Euros

European Union Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides this morning affirmed strong #EU support and commitment to Uganda to deal with the world’s fastest growing #refugee crisis.

Addressing delegates at the ongoing Solidarity Summit on Refugees in Kampala, Uganda, hosted by the Government of Uganda and the United Nations, Commissioner Stylianides said: “Today, in agreement with the European Commissioner for Development Aid Neven Mimica and on behalf of the people of Europe, I am pleased to announce that the European Union steps up its support to the refugee response in Uganda with an amount of 85 million euro. With the additional separate announcements from the European Member States who are present here today, the overall help from the people of Europe amount to almost 210million euro.”

Source

Read more...

Irish Business Events

My name is Janet S. Musoloza; I joined the Embassy of Ireland in 1996 when the Embassy was still young (two years old). Essentially, I have seen the Embassy grow!
The Embassy of Ireland’s main business before 2010 was providing development assistance to Uganda. A lot has changed since then, the Embassy is now engaging more on political issues as well as trade and private sector development, in line with the Irish Government’s Africa Strategy. This is an area I have taken on for the last two years. One of the ways this has been implemented is by engaging more with Irish businesses.
We held a first business breakfast in March 2011 at the Ambassador’s residence. The objective was to kick-start an informal network of Irish business people in Uganda with the idea that the network could assist Irish businesses. The Embassy was also interested in knowing what kind of support it could provide, to encourage the entrance of new Irish private sector actors into the Ugandan market.
The concept was slow to take off, but I feel we now have some momentum behind us – we have even established the Irish Business Network Uganda on LinkedIn! Meetings are now held at various venues, with interesting twists to the event to spice it up. For example, we had an evening of Irish whisky testing where the Dutch business network was invited; one of the positive results from that evening saw an Irish coffee-grower connected with a Dutch coffee dealer. In other events, we have discussed issues pertinent to carrying out effective business in Uganda. Feedback from participants is that new Irish business people are really benefiting from connections through our network, as well as from the knowledge and expertise of those who have been in Uganda longer. We have seen new companies opening up in Uganda in the areas of Renewable Energy, construction, security, Information technology and mining & Exploration. We have also realised a tremendous increase in the number of those seeking to invest in Uganda.

Irish Business Events

Janet Shimanya welcoming Joan Kelly (an Irish Business lady in Uganda)

My name is Janet S. Musoloza; I joined the Embassy of Ireland in 1996 when the Embassy was still young (two years old).  Essentially, I have seen the Embassy grow!

The Embassy of Ireland’s main business before 2010 was providing development assistance to Uganda.  A lot has changed since then, the Embassy is now engaging more on political issues as well as trade and private sector development, in line with the Irish Government’s Africa Strategy. This is   an area I have taken on for the last two years.  One of the ways this has been implemented is by engaging more with Irish businesses.

We held a first business breakfast in March 2011 at the Ambassador’s residence.  The objective was to kick-start an informal network of Irish business people in Uganda with the idea that the network could assist Irish businesses.  The Embassy was also interested in knowing what kind of support it could provide, to encourage the entrance of new Irish private sector actors into the Ugandan market.

The concept was slow to take off, but I feel we now have some momentum behind us – we have even established the Irish Business Network Uganda on LinkedIn!  Meetings are now held at various venues, with interesting twists to the event to spice it up.  For example, we had an evening of Irish whisky testing where the Dutch business network was invited; one of the positive results from that evening saw an Irish coffee-grower connected with a Dutch coffee dealer.  In other events, we have discussed issues pertinent to carrying out effective business in Uganda.  Feedback from participants is that new Irish business people are really benefiting from connections through our network, as well as from the knowledge and expertise of those who have been in Uganda longer.  We have seen new companies opening up in Uganda in the areas of Renewable Energy, construction, security, Information technology and mining & Exploration. We have also realised a tremendous increase in the number of those seeking to invest in Uganda.

Stephen Isiko, a local business man, showing the Secretary General, David Cooney, what his company produces

In the last Irish Business Network Uganda (IBNU) event held on the 4th July 2013, participation was from IBNU Members, Local Ugandan Businesses, Ugandan institutions supporting business like Uganda investment Authority and Uganda Export Promotions Board and other Embassies supporting businesses in Uganda.  Sectors represented were energy, security, telecoms, hospitality and agriculture.  The Secretary General and the Director General of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade were in attendance.  Some companies displayed what they do, donors shared the opportunities they have for organisations investing in Uganda, cards were exchanged and links were created.  The event helped us achieve all our objectives for this network which are: – creating networking opportunities to support the growth of Irish business in Uganda; help the entrance of new Irish businesses; and grow business links between Uganda and Ireland.

“The business breakfast gave a sense of what is happening in Uganda economically”, said the Director General, Brendan Rogers.

Connecting people is the essence of what we are trying to do and a big part of this involves helping people, which I particularly enjoy. I get to meet and talk to people and it is rewarding to know that the Embassy played a part in aiding businesses invest in Uganda.

Read more...

Social Protection and Nutrition in Karamoja

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Aliquam suscipit id quam vel faucibus. Etiam porttitor egestas elit eget faucibus. Duis elit risus, aliquam sit amet libero at, facilisis feugiat ipsum. Aenean mollis vehicula urna, ut elementum lectus. Sed eu odio odio. Phasellus ac bibendum nulla, dignissim faucibus lectus. Aliquam non sem a tellus condimentum semper id sit amet lacus. Nulla quis lacus elementum, venenatis augue eu, pulvinar quam. Aliquam at blandit lacus. Integer id nulla nec orci dapibus pulvinar eu non libero. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Duis bibendum erat ut justo vehicula, non pellentesque nibh dictum.

Quisque ut sagittis metus. Nullam at imperdiet urna. Maecenas convallis tincidunt elit, sed malesuada felis bibendum a. Ut in consequat urna. Praesent sit amet dui ut tellus mollis posuere. Donec rutrum bibendum orci, ut rhoncus lectus porta vel. Donec sagittis at lectus a aliquet. Sed a sapien turpis. Suspendisse potenti. Mauris tellus magna, tempor at venenatis in, pretium id urna.

Fusce vel odio pharetra, luctus neque ac, aliquet quam. Praesent vel ipsum in magna posuere rutrum. Duis tincidunt lectus a augue egestas cursus. Duis nibh elit, rhoncus at aliquam sed, lacinia eu felis. Vivamus mi mauris, ornare quis ornare ac, dictum at augue. Etiam vel efficitur massa. Nunc sed mattis metus, eu consectetur arcu. Proin vestibulum mi nec rhoncus tristique. Nulla pulvinar, ipsum quis venenatis pulvinar, eros turpis condimentum ipsum, at commodo nulla metus et mauris. Integer molestie est vitae porta egestas. Sed maximus placerat iaculis. Suspendisse condimentum enim massa, ac sollicitudin metus maximus ac.

Read more...

Keeping cattle for the beef is his retirement bank

My name is Januario Bamurumba, 77 years of age, a resident of Kyamusyoka Village Kabingo Sub-county, Isingiro District but with roots in Bushenyi District and a home in Mbarara Municipality.

I decided to invest my retirement package in beef ranching and consider it a safe way to keep my money than the bank.
Previously, in the 1970s, I had been keeping the Ankole long-horned cattle while at the same time dealing in beer. Then, I was an agent of Uganda Breweries under Ankole Original Traders.
After being with these local breeds for about 20 years, I realised they were not giving me the returns I needed. This was because the milk production was very low yet they were expensive to look after. I could not cope with the rigours of maintaining milk cattle and also continue with the beer business.
I found out that milk cattle are very delicate and needed my supervision most of the time yet I had to pursue the other business.
By the time I changed from dairy to beef farming, I had less land so I had to buy more. Currently, my ranch sits on a square mile of land.

Why keep beef animals

I decided to change to keeping beef animals, which require less care yet the returns are very high. The natural choice at that time was the Boran. At that time I had 100 heads of Ankole long-horned cattle, which I crossbred with the Boran cattle.

Boran cattle require less labour, grow very fast, multiply easily and bring in faster returns on investment. Besides, they have very good tender meat, which is much sought after by the consumers in the market.
At one and a half years, the well-fed animals especially the bulls will have attained the required weight of about 300kg and I am able to sell them at about Shs 1.2m. Recently, I introduced the Brahman beef cattle from Kenya on my farm.

I have since further developed the ranch by fencing it off, I dug two dams to provide a constant source of water. I am in the process of introducing the water into every paddock to avoid driving the animals to the water points, which they are currently using.
Initial capital
I first bought 230 hectares of land at Shs1m in 1972 and later 100 hectares at Shs15m.
I started with a stock of 100 heads of cattle, which have since multiplied to 400. Running a ranch is not very difficult but I meet some challenges like retaining workers as they keep moving from farm to farm.
I sell animals to traders and other farmers interested in beef ranching. A mature bull, which weighs about 600kg goes for Shs3m while a cow will fetch between Shs1.5m and Shs2m.

I spend about Shs20m on maintenance and make Shs80m annually from the sales of about 120 heads of cattle. Iam assured of the market because of the quality of animals on my farm. Because of the demand, traders usually call me to confirm whether I have the animals before coming for them.
To get good quality animals I have been importing Boran bulls from breeders in Kenya and I have no regrets because the results are there for everybody to see. The last bull I bought cost me Shs7m.
It is surprising that while many animals die during the drought, I have never lost any animals since I started beef farming in such circumstances because the Boran can withstand harsh conditions.
During the 1999 dry season, which was the harshest in the recent times in the Ankole region, very many people lost their animals.
But I never lost even one yet the animals went for a whole month without adequate pastures. They were literally “eating soil and drinking water because it is one of the major component in cattle keeping; they survived because of water.
This is what drove me to love the animals more and also to dig two dams and acquire a water pump to improve the water delivery.

Constraints

To stem off tick-borne diseases, I dip the cattle once a week and regularly use veterinary services from the service providers in Mbarara. However the ticks have become resistant to the drugs.
Currently, I am faced with the challenge of drug supplies as some are counterfeit while the dip tanks services from the ministry of agriculture are wanting.
Dip tanks drugs should be tested periodically but the machine in Entebbe no longer works, this puts our animals at risk because I only guess when to add in more drugs in the dip.

During the dry season, the ranch is faced with pasture shortage and I have so sell off many animals to avoid losses.
Workers are difficult to keep on the ranch because they keep moving between jobs. At times, they leave at a crucial time when I need them most like during the dry season. I have nine workers including their supervisor.
Cattle keeping is my retirement package, an activity that keeps me on my toes. I did not need a lot of money to inject in the ranch.
This is the best “bank I have and it has enabled me to pay school fees for my five grandchildren in various universities, mine having finished their studies a long time ago.
I have also built a very good house in Mbarara and I have also laid a firm foundation for my children. Some are in business while others work in offices.
I would want my son to take over and may be look into the possibility of value addition like selling the meat instead of live animals and I believe we shall reach that level in the near future.

Read more...

He established the fish farm as a family business

My name is Paul Ssekyewa. I am a fish seed producer and a grow-out farmer. Actually I should speak in the first person plural and say “We are fish seed producers and grow-out farmers, because I am just the managing director in our family business known as Ssenya Fish Farm located at Ssenya Village, five miles from Masaka along the Masaka-Kiwangala Road.

It is run and owned by all of us under Nalubowa Lusembo and Co. Estates. My wife, Rita, is the deputy managing director. Nalubowa, a vet and an accountant, is our first daughter and Lusembo, a Catholic priest, is our first son. Our other children are also part of the business including Pauline Nakyewa, a fisheries scientist.

As a young man, I trained as an accountant and I worked with Masaka Co-operative Union for close to 13 years before venturing into self employment in 1987.

Started young

My interest in farming started while I was young, having been born in a farming family. My father kept cows and grew coffee in Kyebe Sub-county near Lake Victoria. So I grew up eating fish.
In 1980 we acquired about 100 acres of land in Kajjansembe River Valley near Masaka Town. We began with crop production but in 1982-1983, we introduced livestock and poultry.
In 1985, we started animal and poultry feeds production on our farm. Poultry was quite paying and at one time we had about 6,000 layers and we would collect about 150 trays per day.
Later, in 1988, we were beneficiaries of a European Union loan granted through the then Uganda Commercial Bank, under the Development Finance Division, that further boosted our poultry farming and enabled us to put up more buildings.
However poultry keeping became complicated when through the Barter Trade system, the government allowed the importation of chicks from southern Africa. Due diligence had not been applied to their importation because they were not accompanied with the medications and vaccination drugs to fortify them against diseases from their areas of origin.
Most of the farmers lost their stocks to the new disease known as Gumboro. We opted to suspend poultry on the farm as a result.

Tap opportunity

We went into fish farming in 1998 through advice from a visiting friend to make use of a water logged spot on our farm. With the help of the District Fisheries officer, the late Okello, we were able to make our first fish pond and to stock it with tilapia and the cat fish in 1999/2000 with a view to have fish for our family consumption and to sell the surplus.
However around 2002, the government came up with a programme to stock farmers� fish ponds and minor water bodies and we thought we could tap into the opportunity by becoming fish seed producers.
But we did not have the technology and the infrastructure and so we had to bring in scientists from Kenya to teach my wife, our two children, and myself about fish hatchery management and practices.
We supplemented the training with reading books on aquaculture and we begun producing fish fingerings.
Our daughter, Pauline, went ahead to study aquaculture at Makerere University. Some of my children and I have sought hands-on exposure by visiting other fish farming units in the USA, Norway, the Netherlands, Ghana, Kenya, Israel, Egypt, Thailand, and China.
Today we have about 40 fish ponds and we have the capacity to produce 500,000 catfish fingerings and 250,000 tilapia fingerlings per month. Catfish fingerlings cost between Shs160 and Shs400 depending on size and volume.
Tilapia fingerlings cost between Shs90 and Shs250, again depending on size and volume. We produce both mono-sexed and mixed-sex tilapia fingerings.

Other activities

Seeing that the demand for fish seed was seasonal most of the time, we decided to direct our main effort to grow-out, that is, growing fish for consumption. As we talk now, we have 40,000 tilapia growers (150 grams and above) for table consumption. We are soon to stock 50,000 more tilapia in a month from now. We also practice pond cage fish farming. We sell fish to both the neighbouring villages and buyers from DR Congo and Rwanda at an average of Shs7,000 per kilogramme.
We also carry out trainings of farm mangers, helping those that want to set up fish farms with site planning and pond construction, supplying brood stock to fish seed farmers, selling fish handling and harvesting equipment, supplying larvae feed for catfish and tilapia as well as sinking pellets for juveniles and mature fish. We collaborate with the National Agricultural Research Organisation (Naro) in the propagation, domestication and conservation of local fish species, Uganda Carp (kisinja) and Victoria Carp (ningu) We also work with Makerere University in relation to on-farm based research and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (Jica) on the integrated rice-fish production.

Abundant resources

Fish farming unfortunately has not yet been given the attention it deserves in Uganda. The global trend is that 40 per cent of the fish is farmed. Out of this, Africa farms only between one and three per cent. Most of this is produced by Egypt, which alone grows more fish than all the fish caught in Uganda�s lakes. Yet that country rears all its fish with the water supplied by the Nile which comes from Uganda.
Our appeal to the government and fellow farmers is to invest more in fish farming, considering the abundant water resources we have.
Fish farming is sustainable, it reduces pressure on capture fisheries, and it is also a source of income and high protein food to the farmers and the rest of the population.
Schools and other learning insitutions, right from the primary level, should include fish farming in their activities. Otherwise, it is laughable that we should have schools located near water bodies, which only teach crop agriculture in school gardens.

 

Read more...

Humanitarian Response in Uganda

David originally comes from Jonglei State, South Sudan. Now he lives in a refugee settlement in Adjumani District, Uganda, along with 120,000 other refugees. David fled his country because of violence in his village. He tells of how he was forced to run, with his two daughters and three adults. His brother was left behind in the sudden escape, but David is certain he is alive. He says his brother wants to join them in Uganda, but cannot. There is no way to reach here now, David explains, it is too dangerous.
Recalling the days when they fled brings tears to David’s eyes. He reveals, ‘My wife also ran away because of the fighting, but I don’t know where she is. There were dead bodies all around us in the village, so we just had to escape. Many of our neighbours died’.
When David and the small group he traveled with reached Uganda, he explains, ‘UNHCR received us. They gave us clothes, and other basic items. Then, World Food Programme (WFP) gave us food. Other organisations are helping us too’.
David is a nominated leader in his settlement community. He helps to organise the settlement and coordinates the community around the different relief services being provided, including general food distribution from WFP, with support from Irish Aid.
‘Here we don’t hear the gunshots anymore. Our challenge is just that we have little land and can’t grow food. I have been receiving WFP food aid for two years now. I just learned that WFP is funded by others, and we are so grateful for this; it means life for us. WFP has been with us from the beginning’.
When asked if he wants to return to South Sudan, David says no he cannot. His hope for the future is to someday gain an education from here in Uganda. His hope for his people and his country is that peace will come. He relays that a united South Sudan is what is needed. There, he explains, the country is torn apart by tribalism, but here we play and work together as one people.

Read more...

Senior Citizens Grant in Karamoja

Mary Tiyan, a widow with 3 children and 15 grandchildren, has been receiving the Senior Citizens Grant (SCG) for 2 years. Mary’s own children have all lost their husbands, and are at home without work. She explains that they died during the time of conflict, and one died from disease. She adds that she too lost her husband when she was young.
For Mary the payments are her major source of income, and she says that before she had no income at all. The payments have enabled her to start a small business selling mandazi (small doughnuts). She is now sending her grandchildren to school, and through the payments she is able to buy school books, uniforms and food. Mary has also joined a savings group, which is involved in sensitizing the community on harmful cultural practices. She explains how on the days when you have no money you can go to the savings group and get a loan, and that because she receives the Senior Citizens Grant, she can now access credit.
Prior to the payments, Mary describes, you would just grow your own crops and eat only that, mainly sorghum. Now Mary sometimes buys spaghetti and rice. She even buys meat once in a while, and some days has two meals, lunch and dinner. In the past, she recalls, they would eat only once a day, or sleep without eating at all.
In Mary’s case, as a widow, when she receives she just purchases what she needs most. In her opinion, for those who have lost their husbands, including herself, this money is helping to improve their status in the community. When the money is received she feels relieved and knows that all her needs are taken care of. She adds “I can buy items for the little ones, like sugar and mandazi, and it helps to build a friendship and relationship with them. Even for myself, I was able to buy a blanket”.
When asked what other challenges she is facing in her life, Mary confesses that she is challenged by the open heart of the people who are giving this money to them. She says she has never seen people who would give money away like this. “It is a good kind of challenge”, she notes smiling, “but it is a shock and I hope it continues”.

Read more...