News

Refugee Response Settlement Monitoring Fact-sheet

Uganda Refugee Response Monitoring Settlement Factsheet: Bidibidi | June 2018

Bidibidi settlement was established in September 2016 to host the rapid influx of South Sudanese refugees, primarily arriving from the Equatoria region. The settlement population increased rapidly to over 280,000 people, making it one of the largest refugee settlements in the world. As of December 2016, Bidibidi reached maximum capacity and stopped accepting new arrivals.

Gaps & Challenges

  • There are only few clean water sources available to the population in Bidibidi. Long distance to the water points, long waiting lines and high congestion are issues facing refugees collecting water. The few existing boreholes are of poor quality, nationals reported repairs of the boreholes are continuously delayed. The water supplied is insufficient, which is exacerbated by the dry season. As sources dry up, both refugees and nationals are forced to collect water from unprotected water sources. Furthermore, the poor latrine coverage in the settlement has led to increased open defecation, which further deteriorates the hygiene and sanitation in Bidibidi.
  • Access to quality education is limited for both refugees and the surrounding host community. Schools are few with insufficient classrooms and insufficient teachers leading to low teacher per student ratios. This was reported to severely inhibit the students’ learning environment. This is further deteriorated by the lack of school materials and lack of training for teachers. Moreover, the absence of vocational training institutions limits the opportunities available for students unable to access secondary school or those unable to access tertiary education. This significantly reduces their chances to access livelihoods opportunities in the future.
  • Refugees were provided with non-food items (NFIs), such as saucepans, solar lamps, mattresses and jerry cans, upon arrival to the settlement. These have, however not been re-distributed since the refugees’ arrival, which therefore means they are for the most part worn out or broken. This forces refugees to share with their neighbors and take it in turns to cook. The lack of access to functional NFIs reduces the living standards of refugees.
  • Both refugees and nationals face important challenges in accessing livelihoods opportunities. Refugees, in particular, struggle to access land for agricultural activities. The land provided to them upon arrival is insufficient to cultivate crops and the cost of hiring land is expensive. Moreover, those that do have access to land struggle to harvest their crops as the land is infertile and they have not received improved seeds adapted to the harsh climate conditions. Nationals highlighted they also struggle to access livelihoods training opportunities preventing them from acquiring the skills needed for employment.
  • Child protection was reported as a significant gap in Bidibidi settlement. Refugees highlighted child-headed households are not provided with the appropriate services they need. Moreover, children, particularly young girls, are often sent to collect firewood for their families far from the settlement, which has led to cases of rape and sexual and gender based violence (SGBV). Additionally, theft was reported to be an issue in the settlement where food items are often stolen at night.

For more, follow the link https://reliefweb.int/report/uganda/uganda-refugee-response-monitoring-settlement-fact-sheet-bidi-bidi-june-2018

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Refugee Education in Uganda

Uganda Launched refugee verification report 2018

Refugee Education in Uganda

The pupils of Luru Primary School in Palorinya settlement in Moyo are among the refugees to be verified.

Uganda launches major refugee verification operation

With the support of UNHCR, government officials are using biometric data to verify more than 1 million refugees in the country.

 

http://www.unhcr.org/news/latest/2018/3/5a9959444/uganda-launches-major-refugee-verification-operation.html

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OVC under ECHO Supported project by Windle International Uganda

Africa, the Land of Beauty& Warriors: a Poem by a S2 student of Valley View SS in Bidibidi Refugee Settlement.

One of the 5 core strategic areas of Windle International Uganda is Youth Engagement where the young people are encouraged through creative arts to express themselves through Music, Dance, and Drama.

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Windle Uganda

The 5 year Strategic Planning Process of Windle International Uganda

Windle Uganda

Mr. James Serufusa during the opening of the 4th Strategic planning of Windle International Uganda

Six (6) years ago, in a corseted effort, the then Windle Trust Uganda crafted a framework to show the growth of Windle Trust Uganda into Windle International Uganda. Transforming from managing just scholarships at undergraduate and graduate level to multi education international institutions, its a big milestone achieved.

While opening the session at Kyoto Spiritual Centre in Namugongo, Mr. James Serufusa Mukasa the Board chairperson affirmed the commitment of the board to ensure effective service delivery by diversifying the funding base of Windle Uganda. Call on staff to be committed and serve with passion.

 

 

Communications Department

@WindleUganda

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World Bank Approves $40 Million to Strengthen Social Risks Management

WASHINGTON, June 20, 2017—The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors has approved a $40 million equivalent IDA credit* to the Republic of Uganda for the Strengthening Social Risk Management and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Prevention and Response Project.

The Government of Uganda recognizes GBV as a serious problem and approved a National Policy on the Elimination of GBV in October 2016.  This project, which was approved June 20, 2017, will support the implementation of the policy and will also help strengthen systems for managing social risk in development projects.

GBV is a serious problem across many continents and countries.  Acceptance of intimate partner violence, however, is particularly high in the Africa Region – on average around 30 percent, which is more than twice the average of the rest of the developing world at 14 percent.  “Rates of GBV in Uganda are high,” said Hon. Janat Mukwaya, Minister of Gender, Labor and Social Development“With 62 percent of women and 59 percent of men aged 15-49 in Uganda having reported experiencing physical or sexual violence at least once since the age of 15.  This project aims to help address this disturbing trend.”

The World Bank Country Manager, Christina Malmberg Calvo added that, “Uganda has a number of tried and tested interventions that have shown to be effective in reducing the incidence of GBV through intensive behavior change communication. The project builds on these experiences to take them to scale. The project will also invest in strengthening the capacity of key front-line services to address the needs of survivors of GBV with a strong focus in the health sector.”

As part of this broader agenda on the overall management of social risk, the project aims to address the underlying causes of GBV by developing and expanding prevention programs and increasing response services for survivors of GBV in targeted districts.

Specifically, the project will focus on:

  • promoting behavior change and strengthening referral mechanisms, and
  • strengthening the responsiveness of front-line service providers to cases of GBV, and improving their ability to provide quality care.

*The International Development Association (IDA) provides concessional resources to Uganda, and this $40 million credit has a zero percentage interest rate, with a final maturity of 38 years, including a grace period of 6 years.

Source

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Europe steps up its support to the refugee response in Uganda with amounts almost 210 million Euros

European Union Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides this morning affirmed strong #EU support and commitment to Uganda to deal with the world’s fastest growing #refugee crisis.

Addressing delegates at the ongoing Solidarity Summit on Refugees in Kampala, Uganda, hosted by the Government of Uganda and the United Nations, Commissioner Stylianides said: “Today, in agreement with the European Commissioner for Development Aid Neven Mimica and on behalf of the people of Europe, I am pleased to announce that the European Union steps up its support to the refugee response in Uganda with an amount of 85 million euro. With the additional separate announcements from the European Member States who are present here today, the overall help from the people of Europe amount to almost 210million euro.”

Source

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Irish Business Events

My name is Janet S. Musoloza; I joined the Embassy of Ireland in 1996 when the Embassy was still young (two years old). Essentially, I have seen the Embassy grow!
The Embassy of Ireland’s main business before 2010 was providing development assistance to Uganda. A lot has changed since then, the Embassy is now engaging more on political issues as well as trade and private sector development, in line with the Irish Government’s Africa Strategy. This is an area I have taken on for the last two years. One of the ways this has been implemented is by engaging more with Irish businesses.
We held a first business breakfast in March 2011 at the Ambassador’s residence. The objective was to kick-start an informal network of Irish business people in Uganda with the idea that the network could assist Irish businesses. The Embassy was also interested in knowing what kind of support it could provide, to encourage the entrance of new Irish private sector actors into the Ugandan market.
The concept was slow to take off, but I feel we now have some momentum behind us – we have even established the Irish Business Network Uganda on LinkedIn! Meetings are now held at various venues, with interesting twists to the event to spice it up. For example, we had an evening of Irish whisky testing where the Dutch business network was invited; one of the positive results from that evening saw an Irish coffee-grower connected with a Dutch coffee dealer. In other events, we have discussed issues pertinent to carrying out effective business in Uganda. Feedback from participants is that new Irish business people are really benefiting from connections through our network, as well as from the knowledge and expertise of those who have been in Uganda longer. We have seen new companies opening up in Uganda in the areas of Renewable Energy, construction, security, Information technology and mining & Exploration. We have also realised a tremendous increase in the number of those seeking to invest in Uganda.

Irish Business Events

Janet Shimanya welcoming Joan Kelly (an Irish Business lady in Uganda)

My name is Janet S. Musoloza; I joined the Embassy of Ireland in 1996 when the Embassy was still young (two years old).  Essentially, I have seen the Embassy grow!

The Embassy of Ireland’s main business before 2010 was providing development assistance to Uganda.  A lot has changed since then, the Embassy is now engaging more on political issues as well as trade and private sector development, in line with the Irish Government’s Africa Strategy. This is   an area I have taken on for the last two years.  One of the ways this has been implemented is by engaging more with Irish businesses.

We held a first business breakfast in March 2011 at the Ambassador’s residence.  The objective was to kick-start an informal network of Irish business people in Uganda with the idea that the network could assist Irish businesses.  The Embassy was also interested in knowing what kind of support it could provide, to encourage the entrance of new Irish private sector actors into the Ugandan market.

The concept was slow to take off, but I feel we now have some momentum behind us – we have even established the Irish Business Network Uganda on LinkedIn!  Meetings are now held at various venues, with interesting twists to the event to spice it up.  For example, we had an evening of Irish whisky testing where the Dutch business network was invited; one of the positive results from that evening saw an Irish coffee-grower connected with a Dutch coffee dealer.  In other events, we have discussed issues pertinent to carrying out effective business in Uganda.  Feedback from participants is that new Irish business people are really benefiting from connections through our network, as well as from the knowledge and expertise of those who have been in Uganda longer.  We have seen new companies opening up in Uganda in the areas of Renewable Energy, construction, security, Information technology and mining & Exploration. We have also realised a tremendous increase in the number of those seeking to invest in Uganda.

Stephen Isiko, a local business man, showing the Secretary General, David Cooney, what his company produces

In the last Irish Business Network Uganda (IBNU) event held on the 4th July 2013, participation was from IBNU Members, Local Ugandan Businesses, Ugandan institutions supporting business like Uganda investment Authority and Uganda Export Promotions Board and other Embassies supporting businesses in Uganda.  Sectors represented were energy, security, telecoms, hospitality and agriculture.  The Secretary General and the Director General of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade were in attendance.  Some companies displayed what they do, donors shared the opportunities they have for organisations investing in Uganda, cards were exchanged and links were created.  The event helped us achieve all our objectives for this network which are: – creating networking opportunities to support the growth of Irish business in Uganda; help the entrance of new Irish businesses; and grow business links between Uganda and Ireland.

“The business breakfast gave a sense of what is happening in Uganda economically”, said the Director General, Brendan Rogers.

Connecting people is the essence of what we are trying to do and a big part of this involves helping people, which I particularly enjoy. I get to meet and talk to people and it is rewarding to know that the Embassy played a part in aiding businesses invest in Uganda.

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Social Protection and Nutrition in Karamoja

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Humanitarian Response in Uganda

David originally comes from Jonglei State, South Sudan. Now he lives in a refugee settlement in Adjumani District, Uganda, along with 120,000 other refugees. David fled his country because of violence in his village. He tells of how he was forced to run, with his two daughters and three adults. His brother was left behind in the sudden escape, but David is certain he is alive. He says his brother wants to join them in Uganda, but cannot. There is no way to reach here now, David explains, it is too dangerous.
Recalling the days when they fled brings tears to David’s eyes. He reveals, ‘My wife also ran away because of the fighting, but I don’t know where she is. There were dead bodies all around us in the village, so we just had to escape. Many of our neighbours died’.
When David and the small group he traveled with reached Uganda, he explains, ‘UNHCR received us. They gave us clothes, and other basic items. Then, World Food Programme (WFP) gave us food. Other organisations are helping us too’.
David is a nominated leader in his settlement community. He helps to organise the settlement and coordinates the community around the different relief services being provided, including general food distribution from WFP, with support from Irish Aid.
‘Here we don’t hear the gunshots anymore. Our challenge is just that we have little land and can’t grow food. I have been receiving WFP food aid for two years now. I just learned that WFP is funded by others, and we are so grateful for this; it means life for us. WFP has been with us from the beginning’.
When asked if he wants to return to South Sudan, David says no he cannot. His hope for the future is to someday gain an education from here in Uganda. His hope for his people and his country is that peace will come. He relays that a united South Sudan is what is needed. There, he explains, the country is torn apart by tribalism, but here we play and work together as one people.

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